Lewisham Mental Health Carers forum September 2021

Welcome to the September update of my Lewisham mental health carer forum 2021. As a note, the carer’s forum is an engagement group aimed at those caring for someone who suffer’s mental ill health.

Since the carer’s forum focuses on carer’s from Lewisham, we tend to get engagement from mental health services of South London & Maudsley NHS foundation trust. I am grateful for the support our local NHS trust gives to families and carers. It is important that families, friends and carers remain that strong link in coping and recovery.

The speaker’s for September were

  • Leonie Down – Lewisham Head of Occupational Therapy and Partnerships Lead from South London & Maudsley
  • Ros King – Regional carer lead for London from NHS England
  • Charles Malcolm-Smith – People & Provider Development Lead from NHS South East London CCG (Lewisham)

Leonie Down presents on the importance of Occupational Therapy

As mentioned earlier, South London & maudsley prides itself on the engagement and involvement of those who use it’s services and those who care for patients. It was great to have Leonie engage with our carer group on the importance of Occupational therapy.

Leonie stated her talk on how occuptional therapy can help people manage their routines at home, and also occuptional therapy helps look at the physical health component and ways for people to adapt to disability. Leonie presented an example from The World Federation of occupational therapists (WFOT).

“Occupational therapy is a client-centred health profession concerned with promoting health and well being through occupation. The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. Occupational therapists achieve this outcome by working with people and communities to enhance their ability to engage in the occupations they want to, need to, or are expected to do, or by modifying the occupation or the environment to better support their occupational engagement” (WFOT 2012)

Leonie admitted the defination was a bit wordy, but it does encompass the fact that it’s about activity and occupation and that’s the medium through which Maudsley NHS deliver their interventions.

Leonie has worked as an OT for around 30 years, a lot of people ask her, what’s an OT do? So she often responds that it’s about supporting people to do the things that makes them feel better. So it’s very much about what people spend their time doing, what people feel, what activities that make people feel feel better, make them stronger in themselves, plus setting their direction towards recovery. As an OT, it’s a degree that they have three years in training as an occupational therapist, which ultimately equips them to be able to understand the needs of each individual. These could be what strength and barriers might be around the person or being able to access activities that make me feel better, and that could be multifaceted.

Leonie then presented on the following, where how can service users benefit from OT. The following points were explained.

How OT promotes self-expression, creativity and the development of hobbie

Where OT can improve / develop

  • feelings of self-esteem and confidence
  • level of self-awareness, understanding and insight
  • ability to manage health conditions and ADLs
  • social interaction and communication skills
  • coping strategies and self-management techniques

How OT supports the development of roles, responsibilities and routine, as well as identifying and working towards goals

Promotes healthier lifestyle choices and greater levels of physical activity

Increases the chances of an earlier discharge and the likelihood of them being able to remain safe and independent in the community

Improves the patient experience and wellbeing.

Leonie then moved on to present the work being done in Lewisham regarding OT, where they are trying to work with as many social inclusion partners as possible. So one half is Lewisham community connections, where people are helping those using the services navigate through to something that they can be doing to help their health.

The other aspect of OT in Lewisham, is very much about trying to co-produce and co-deliver a program of groups. Which is for people that that may benefit from the environment that involves other people. This is because other people, from the same environment can learn or hear different insights, which can lead us to start making sense of our own experiences and possibly develop tools to become self reliant.

There was then a Q&A session from carer members of the Lewisham MH carer forum.

Ros King from NHS England speaks about ICS changes

Ros King kindly engages with my carer groups when she can, so today she was invited to speak about the important of Integrated Care Systems. Ros started explaining about NHS England and how it is a huge organization and can be very complicated. Ros mentioned how NHS England is basically the body that sets health policy with the department of health and social care. Such policy helps plan for what the health service will be focusing on where It also holds allocated budgets. The budgets are then allocated down to CCGs where Ros explained that there has been quite a few changes.

It was explained that a couple of years ago, the responsibility was around Clinical Commissioning Groups, and NHS improvement was concerned with providers, so acute trusts and some changes were implemented which led to a merger to become NHS England & Improvement.

Ros then explained a bit about The national teams and the regional teams. Where there are seven regions across England. As in other countries just NHS England we have Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, which have different arrangements.

Ros talked about the London region and what sits within the London region, where there are five integrated care systems. These being Southwest London, southeast London, North Central London, northeast London and northwest London. Ros joked that she really hopes nobody has any questions around which CCGs sit within such ICS because that would take some time. Ros talked about how the CCGs have merged to cover such regions around London.

Ros moved on to talk about how NHS England & Improvement would demand lots of information, especially very complicated information about how the CCGs and providing trusts were performing in all sorts of areas. Such requests for information could be at a very short notice because those at NHS England & Improvement have to feed this info back to the organisation.

Ros felt there has been a lot of changes as to whilst regions do still have accountability, So if an acute provider in Lewisham, has really serious concerns and risks about performance of the quality of the services they’re providing, then it is still very much NHS England regional team responsibility to manage and try and work with the provider to improve.

The idea is rather than an acute provider struggling with performancing issues, they should learn from other providers and network together. Still, NHS England has commissioned a lot of things, but now only comission small amount of services which are specialist services. These will be transferred out into ICS.

Ros then talked about how they manage complaints around a primary care service. So GPS, dentist, ophthalmologists, pharmacists and so on. Such complaints would come in to NHS England depending on the complaint e.g. if you have a complaint about any of those services, it would come through to NHS England, or if you had a complaint about a service that was commissioned by your ICS, or your CCG, that would go into the CCG or directly to the organization that’s providing the service.

Charles Malcolm-Smith presents on ICS at a local level.

I had a lot of support from engagement representatives of NHS South East London CCG where Greenwich, Southwark and Lewisham CCGs had organised what to present to carers and also who can support Ros Spink’s presentation.

In the end Charles who is the people & Provider Development Lead from NHS South East London CCG (Lewisham) continued the presentation.

Charles talked about what integrated care system changes that are in the pipeline and how they are designed to work together better. With all the talk about health and social care needing to work better with physical and mental health services, community acute services and primary care, it’s all about the different parts of the system working together and this is about structural change.

It was explained that we have had integrated care systems for a while, but their status had changed from the sustainability and transformation partnerships, where they became ICS even though it is still a partnership status, with the health and social care bill now making ICS statutory organisations. Charles explained that there will be four building blocks to do an ICS. So the ICS for southeast London will have an integrated care partnership board and this is the alliance of organizations that represent across southeast London. These will include the NHS organisations, local authorities and made up of the chairs of the trust.

Elected representatives and elected leadership from each of the local authorities as well as the representative director from Adult Social Care, children, young people services, Healthwatch and voluntary and community sector organizations. Charles reassured us that in southeast London, there aren’t any private sector organizations involved in the partnership since there were a lot of questions from members about privatisation creeping in.

Charles talked about how the Integrated Care board brings the NHS together so it brings commissioners and providers around the table. Charles mentioned it was an important development because the last couple of decades, it has always been a commissioner and provider that were split causing queries with contracts. although there will still be commissioning and providing but the approach to it will be about joint planning. So there will be working together more closely than before.

There were many questions from carer members on if the Local Care Partnership board will debate the importance of unpaid carers and include them in their decisions.

This concludes the brief update of my Lewisham mental health carer forum for September