Tag Archives: Lewisham

Lewisham Mental Health Carers forum September 2021

Welcome to the September update of my Lewisham mental health carer forum 2021. As a note, the carer’s forum is an engagement group aimed at those caring for someone who suffer’s mental ill health.

Since the carer’s forum focuses on carer’s from Lewisham, we tend to get engagement from mental health services of South London & Maudsley NHS foundation trust. I am grateful for the support our local NHS trust gives to families and carers. It is important that families, friends and carers remain that strong link in coping and recovery.

The speaker’s for September were

  • Leonie Down – Lewisham Head of Occupational Therapy and Partnerships Lead from South London & Maudsley
  • Ros King – Regional carer lead for London from NHS England
  • Charles Malcolm-Smith – People & Provider Development Lead from NHS South East London CCG (Lewisham)

Leonie Down presents on the importance of Occupational Therapy

As mentioned earlier, South London & maudsley prides itself on the engagement and involvement of those who use it’s services and those who care for patients. It was great to have Leonie engage with our carer group on the importance of Occupational therapy.

Leonie stated her talk on how occuptional therapy can help people manage their routines at home, and also occuptional therapy helps look at the physical health component and ways for people to adapt to disability. Leonie presented an example from The World Federation of occupational therapists (WFOT).

“Occupational therapy is a client-centred health profession concerned with promoting health and well being through occupation. The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. Occupational therapists achieve this outcome by working with people and communities to enhance their ability to engage in the occupations they want to, need to, or are expected to do, or by modifying the occupation or the environment to better support their occupational engagement” (WFOT 2012)

Leonie admitted the defination was a bit wordy, but it does encompass the fact that it’s about activity and occupation and that’s the medium through which Maudsley NHS deliver their interventions.

Leonie has worked as an OT for around 30 years, a lot of people ask her, what’s an OT do? So she often responds that it’s about supporting people to do the things that makes them feel better. So it’s very much about what people spend their time doing, what people feel, what activities that make people feel feel better, make them stronger in themselves, plus setting their direction towards recovery. As an OT, it’s a degree that they have three years in training as an occupational therapist, which ultimately equips them to be able to understand the needs of each individual. These could be what strength and barriers might be around the person or being able to access activities that make me feel better, and that could be multifaceted.

Leonie then presented on the following, where how can service users benefit from OT. The following points were explained.

How OT promotes self-expression, creativity and the development of hobbie

Where OT can improve / develop

  • feelings of self-esteem and confidence
  • level of self-awareness, understanding and insight
  • ability to manage health conditions and ADLs
  • social interaction and communication skills
  • coping strategies and self-management techniques

How OT supports the development of roles, responsibilities and routine, as well as identifying and working towards goals

Promotes healthier lifestyle choices and greater levels of physical activity

Increases the chances of an earlier discharge and the likelihood of them being able to remain safe and independent in the community

Improves the patient experience and wellbeing.

Leonie then moved on to present the work being done in Lewisham regarding OT, where they are trying to work with as many social inclusion partners as possible. So one half is Lewisham community connections, where people are helping those using the services navigate through to something that they can be doing to help their health.

The other aspect of OT in Lewisham, is very much about trying to co-produce and co-deliver a program of groups. Which is for people that that may benefit from the environment that involves other people. This is because other people, from the same environment can learn or hear different insights, which can lead us to start making sense of our own experiences and possibly develop tools to become self reliant.

There was then a Q&A session from carer members of the Lewisham MH carer forum.

Ros King from NHS England speaks about ICS changes

Ros King kindly engages with my carer groups when she can, so today she was invited to speak about the important of Integrated Care Systems. Ros started explaining about NHS England and how it is a huge organization and can be very complicated. Ros mentioned how NHS England is basically the body that sets health policy with the department of health and social care. Such policy helps plan for what the health service will be focusing on where It also holds allocated budgets. The budgets are then allocated down to CCGs where Ros explained that there has been quite a few changes.

It was explained that a couple of years ago, the responsibility was around Clinical Commissioning Groups, and NHS improvement was concerned with providers, so acute trusts and some changes were implemented which led to a merger to become NHS England & Improvement.

Ros then explained a bit about The national teams and the regional teams. Where there are seven regions across England. As in other countries just NHS England we have Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, which have different arrangements.

Ros talked about the London region and what sits within the London region, where there are five integrated care systems. These being Southwest London, southeast London, North Central London, northeast London and northwest London. Ros joked that she really hopes nobody has any questions around which CCGs sit within such ICS because that would take some time. Ros talked about how the CCGs have merged to cover such regions around London.

Ros moved on to talk about how NHS England & Improvement would demand lots of information, especially very complicated information about how the CCGs and providing trusts were performing in all sorts of areas. Such requests for information could be at a very short notice because those at NHS England & Improvement have to feed this info back to the organisation.

Ros felt there has been a lot of changes as to whilst regions do still have accountability, So if an acute provider in Lewisham, has really serious concerns and risks about performance of the quality of the services they’re providing, then it is still very much NHS England regional team responsibility to manage and try and work with the provider to improve.

The idea is rather than an acute provider struggling with performancing issues, they should learn from other providers and network together. Still, NHS England has commissioned a lot of things, but now only comission small amount of services which are specialist services. These will be transferred out into ICS.

Ros then talked about how they manage complaints around a primary care service. So GPS, dentist, ophthalmologists, pharmacists and so on. Such complaints would come in to NHS England depending on the complaint e.g. if you have a complaint about any of those services, it would come through to NHS England, or if you had a complaint about a service that was commissioned by your ICS, or your CCG, that would go into the CCG or directly to the organization that’s providing the service.

Charles Malcolm-Smith presents on ICS at a local level.

I had a lot of support from engagement representatives of NHS South East London CCG where Greenwich, Southwark and Lewisham CCGs had organised what to present to carers and also who can support Ros Spink’s presentation.

In the end Charles who is the people & Provider Development Lead from NHS South East London CCG (Lewisham) continued the presentation.

Charles talked about what integrated care system changes that are in the pipeline and how they are designed to work together better. With all the talk about health and social care needing to work better with physical and mental health services, community acute services and primary care, it’s all about the different parts of the system working together and this is about structural change.

It was explained that we have had integrated care systems for a while, but their status had changed from the sustainability and transformation partnerships, where they became ICS even though it is still a partnership status, with the health and social care bill now making ICS statutory organisations. Charles explained that there will be four building blocks to do an ICS. So the ICS for southeast London will have an integrated care partnership board and this is the alliance of organizations that represent across southeast London. These will include the NHS organisations, local authorities and made up of the chairs of the trust.

Elected representatives and elected leadership from each of the local authorities as well as the representative director from Adult Social Care, children, young people services, Healthwatch and voluntary and community sector organizations. Charles reassured us that in southeast London, there aren’t any private sector organizations involved in the partnership since there were a lot of questions from members about privatisation creeping in.

Charles talked about how the Integrated Care board brings the NHS together so it brings commissioners and providers around the table. Charles mentioned it was an important development because the last couple of decades, it has always been a commissioner and provider that were split causing queries with contracts. although there will still be commissioning and providing but the approach to it will be about joint planning. So there will be working together more closely than before.

There were many questions from carer members on if the Local Care Partnership board will debate the importance of unpaid carers and include them in their decisions.

This concludes the brief update of my Lewisham mental health carer forum for September

Bromley, Greenwich & Lewisham BAME Carer Forum August 2021

This is a brief update for my BAME mental health carer forum covering a mix of London boroughs between Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust and South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

Obviously out of my 6 carer groups, this forum focuses and discusses on the unique experiences of Black Asian Minority Ethnic groups. I know some people want such groups to be specific, but to be fair a lot of the topics raised in this forum do focus on the afro caribbean element, although some members are mixed from the Asian community, which is growing as members from other MH NHS trust attend.

The speakers for the month of August were

Malik Gul – Ethnicity & Mental Health Improvement
Jacqui Dillon – Race and mental health
Cordwell Thomas – Black Thrive
Dawn Irving – Maudsley NHS Quality improvement

  • Malik Gul presents on Ethnicity & Mental Health

Malik was really pleased to be among carer members of this forum. Malik felt the issue of race and mental health is not new, this is especially in the field of discrimination and racism in the services of our communities. Malik stressed that what we’ve had to endure as black and brown people has been known since we first landed in this country, But since the main kind of population of migration into this country, following the Second World War, and what is euphemistically known as the Windrush generation.

Since the days that we’ve arrived in this country, we have been discriminated against. Racism is built in to the very fabric of the systems that we all live in, and we must admit that it is a part of the system, and all of us in this conversation have experienced that. We’re all a part of it and we have all been discriminated against, in one form or another.

what Malik finds really interesting about the work he does, is that he has been working in Wandsworth at the Wandsworth Community Empowerment Network for the last 20 years.

More info on the Wandsworth Community Empowerment Network

It is now their 20th anniversary and the organization was founded in 2001. The thing is the organisation knows about the history of black discrimination. Many of us will know about David rocky Bennett, a black man, Rastafarian man, who was in mental health facility in Norfolk, and unfortunately there was a dispute on the ward, something really minor, Malik thinks it was about who could use the phone and who somebody jumped in front of the queue, or something like that. He was held down by the staff, and died in mental health services, what is worse is this is just one of the many cases of ethnic minorities dying not of mental health services, but within mental health services.

So the history of black people in mental health services being discriminated against is a story that we’ve all lived and experienced for the better part of 40 to 50 years. Malik felt that he has to us that nothing has changed.

Malik works very closely with Southwest London & St. George’s mental health trust, and also very closely with South London & Maudsley as well. In fact the new chief executive of SL&M is David Bradley who was the former chief executive of SWL&STG. Malik mentioned how he worked with him for about seven years and over the last 20 years, if you look at the figures for black people where it comes to over representation in medical health services for 20 years, it shows little to nothing has improved, and in fact, in some cases, things have got much worse. Malik mentioned that he has great admiration for David because he always had the foresight to work with the community and is bringing over ideas from his previous MH trust over to SL&M.

Malik challenged us that if you go on to the wards of Springfield hospital, as he does on a regular basis, about 50-60 70% of the people on the wards are for black and minority ethnic communities. Malik pointed out that we had to look at the over representation of black people in communities particularly in services particularly black, Caribbean, and black African.

Malik stated that he has to say that our mental health institutions are not the ones who are going to address this type of problem. He felt SL&M is not the solution to over representation of black people in mental health services, nor is Southwest London St. George’s mental health trust. Nor are any of the institutions that we are relying on to fix this issue. They are not going to address the over representation of black people in mental health services. It will have to be lead by the community, but there is a power problem, an owership problem a distrust problem. This overrepresentation in mental healths services has been going on for so long that the community has felt apathetic to any drive in order to change the status quo.

There was a very long discussion on what was needed to begin to address this issue, but the conclusion is it must from ethnic minorities, but controvesally we cannot expect the victim to solve the problem as we cannot expect the masters tools to change direction.

Jacqui Dillon presents on Race and mental health

Dr Jacqui wanted to talk a little bit about her own experiences, and on why Matthew invited her to the BAME forum. Jacqui Dillion is the former chair of the national hearing voices network, which is a user led charity that was set up about 30 years ago to provide an alternative to mainstream psychiatry.

Jacqui felt she is basically a survivor. she has used psychiatric services and one of the things that she often says about why she has worked as an activist in mental health for 25 years, is because her experiences of psychiatrists, which unfortunately was pretty devastating.

Jacqui felt that one of the things is if she managed to survive services, she would do all she can to try and change them. So that’s what she has been trying to do for about 25 years now. One of the things that she thinks is really important in terms of what we’re talking about today, in terms of the hearing voices network approach is that we do not advocate a Eurocentric model of the mind.

She felt that this is one of the problems that Malik talked really passionately and eloquently about on the huge over representation of black, Asian, and other minority ethnic people using the mental health services. One of the things that’s really important about the hearing voices approach is that this space within that approach is to both acknowledge the live reality of racism and oppression, which in her experience is often taboo in traditional settings, a lot of people flinch and are very frightened, and can get quite defensive about acknowledging that black and Asian people are massively over represented in services, and what’s at the heart of all things, which ian macpherson talked about in the macpherson report.

Our colonial history is built into the fabric of the these institutions, and things like unconscious bias that professionals come with, and often they’re not aware of their own biases, and then making treatment decisions based on some quite racist assumptions that have been intertwined with such systems.

Jacqui feels a lot of despair, about the over representation of many different people from different ethnic backgrounds, although she is really uncomfortable with the term minority ethnic groups, because since she lives in Hackney people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic communities are 50% of her community. So she finds the description a bit reductive and these kind of acronyms we use can be a little bit dehumanizing.

Jacqui also felt she hasnt seen things improve, there used to be an organization’s called family health, ISIS, which she worked with, about 17 years ago with someone called Dennis who she did a lot of work with in terms of trying to bring the hearing voices approach to FHI as an alternative to traditional psychiatry. She was sad to hear that Family Health ISIS is now closed as with many community groups looking to set up protected spaces for those who are vulnerable and what remains are these massive mental health trusts overpowering the voices of the vulnerable.

One of the things she would like to see is a move away from locating people’s problems solely within themselves and seeing that we’re all part of a system. Jacqui feels that one of the problems with the biomedical model, is by saying that people have illnesses, what we’re doing is we’re kind of saying, madness and distress don’t really make sense and limiting away the causes of such illnesses such as the pressure of society, racism, isolation from the community, no safe places, lack of resources, lack of community, lack of understanding and so on.

Jacqui felt that we give illnesses these bizarre names like schizophrenia, which she thinks, further mystifies what are actually very human ways of coping with devastating and overwhelming experiences. So she personally does not subscribe to that kind of biomedical language and feels that it is really unhelpful. There’s actually tons of research that has shown that using medicalized language actually increases stigma and decreases people’s empathy. Jacqui mentioned that someone put on the zoom chat about how trauma informed her, Jacqui felt this was more interesting about how something like trauma informed care can develop, but talking about language is a problem where the term trauma can minimises experiences. We have a long way to go in psychiatry before we even get to the idea of recovery.

If you want to know more of Dr Jacqui Dillon’s work see the link below.

http://www.jacquidillon.org/

Cordwell Thomas presents on Black Thrive

Next to present was Cordwell thomas on his role within the organisation Black Thrive. Cordwell spoke about what Black Thrive is doing to promote and also promote what the imbalance of what Malik and Jacqui clearly stated, and also the questions coming from what carer members raised, Cordwell felt there is a concern on black individuals within the black community, having a say in their mental health and promoting the services and shaping the service to be fit for purpose. Cordwell wanted to go into a small conversation about the Patient Race Equality Framework.

On Cordwell’s role, he has several hats. He has a full time role mainly within the community, one of which is on the Black Thrive committee. On the Black Thrive committee, there are various agencies from public services, these are ranging from social workers, public health officers and directors, where they also have the police and many more. So fortunately they also have directors and decision makers who are on the table of Black Thrive and they shape the way they engage with communities and how those services engage with black communities in particular.

So, within that role Cordwell helps to represent the community, but within Black Thrive, he is an independent advisor, which enables him to liaise with South London & Maudsley NHS, and also help develop services within SL&M. In particular those services that have been disproportionately affecting black individuals within the community, like individuals from Caribbean descent.

With such roles it is what brought him to this forum to have a conversation with us, because one of his roles, actions or projects, is to be the lead person from the black community driving the trusted friend project,

Cordwell mentioned that he presented with a colleague from SL&M the trusted friend project, a couple of weeks ago at the Lambeth Carers Hub peer group, which Matthew attended. from that forum Matthew requested us to speak about trusted friend for this forum. Basically what it’s about is if you imagine a situation where you’re in a strange environment, ie as if you’re now a psychiatric inpatient, at one of SL&Ms hospitals, if you imagine yourself in a strange environment and you do not have a voice. Now the role of the trusted friend is to ease and promote that de escalation. So the impatient ward may go through all their various roles of de escalation on an issue, however the trusted friend will come on the ward and be that middle person that liaises with the ward staff and say what the wishes of the individual are.

More info on Black Thrive

There was most in-depth discussions about other Black Thrive projects, but for now this was the brief update of the Bromley, Lewisham & Greenwich MH carer forum for August 2021

Lewisham Mental Health Carers forum August 2021

It has been a long time coming since I have been so busy on writing my 2nd book which is title “Experiencing mental health caregiving – unpaid carers”. I have decided to take a break on my book and do another blog update. As usual I host many carer support groups and carer empowerment forums. This blog post is an update of my Lewisham carer forum.

The speakers for August were Denis Muganga who is the Service Manager for Lewisham In-Patient MH Services and works at South London and Maudsley. Denis is also deputy head of nursing at the mental health wards in Lewisham.

Denis spoke about Reducing Prone Restraint on Lewisham Acute wards. Many families and those caring for loved ones are often worried about the risk of restraint on mental health wards. Once a patient is in the care of mental health inpatient services then it is out of unpaid carers hands and we have to take a step back.

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Lewisham Mental Health Carers forum June 2021

Welcome to the June update of my Lewisham mental health carers forum. For the month of June my MP Janet Daby who attended to speak to unpaid carers and update us on what Lewisham has been doing for unpaid carers since carers week 2021.

Also in attendance was Jo Power who is the Liaison Officer for the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman.

Cath Collins – Carer support worker presents on her role.

Before Janet spoke about unpaid carers, I felt it important that Cath Collins had a chance to speak about her role and her passion to support mental health carers. Cath Collins used to work for SL&M as a carers support officer, but is now employed by Lewisham council, but in a similar role.

Cath spoke about what she is employed to do and what she has been doing. Her remit is with the adult community mental health team. So she does not work with CAMHs, the children, adolescent teams, the older adults. She spoke about how we have primary mental health care teams in Lewisham, which is part of a new transformation of services, that should be aligned to GP practices.

Cath also spoke about having community teams where people have a longer period of support who suffer from serious long term mental health conditions. She mentioend we also have specialist teams in between, which are Early intervention services, which is for people in the first episode of psychosis, regardless of what age they are SL&M also have a personality disorder service.

Cath’s remit is to work with the teams to look at several things where one of them is to look at the information that they give to families and carers. These being are they getting the national up to date information? Other things focus on is such info good information about diagnosis? how to care for someone with a specific diagnosis? being involved in discussions around the care? If not, then why not? and how we could work on it?

With advice and information service, Cath reminded that they have got a group tonight, which is a mental health care support group where people can attend and speakers will go through important topics.

Janet Daby section.

I consider it very important MPs and those who lead on social care engage with those who are vulnerable in the community, especially if the group is grassroots and self-led. I am sure there are reasons why representatives would not want to speak to vulnerable groups, but those reasons are very few and far between.

It is also a two way thing, not only is it important for MPs to link with unpaid carers, but also unpaid carers understand the importance of forming relations. Too often I hear from unpaid carers that they are in an urgent situation and wish for counsel, which is fair. However I wonder in the back of my mind if something could have been done before things got out of control. It might be usually up to carers to keep their ears to the ground and find out what is really in store for them, even if they have the unpleasant task of trying to hold health and social care leaders to account.

Janet mentioned that Carers Week, which took place this year from 7 – 13 June, is an important opportunity to recognise, value and support unpaid carers. She felt that the Government must properly fund respite breaks so carers can put their own needs first, and ensure they can continue to provide vital, life-saving care and support. She knows that this is something that both Carers UK and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services have been calling for.

Janet remains concerned that until there is long-term investment in social care, unpaid carers will continue to be overwhelmed. After a decade of cuts to local government, £8 billion has been lost from adult social care budgets and too many families have been left to cope without the support they need.

The Government first promised to publish its plans to reform social care over four years ago. Despite repeated promises, Ministers have still not brought forward any legislation, new funding, details, or timescales for reform. The recent Queen’s Speech, setting out the legislative agenda for the year ahead, was absent of any detailed plans.

Janet continued speaking to our group about being happy to attend and meet with us even if it was more than once a year. She spoke about her plans and concerns about the SL&M’s Ladywell unit and her plans to raise queries and questions with the chair of SL&M. I asked questions about Lewisham’s focus for carers and how those who lead on social care could engage with our group where Janet mentioned a few people. As a group we have been struggling to get engagement from those who lead on social care, but in other areas of London it seems easier to get that engagement, other carers have mentioned it is not worth the hassle, but I feel it is important to get such engagement even if they respond with bad news. Nothing is worse than being ignored and left to try and support others going through isolation, exhausting and feeling they are not being heard.

Jo Power Ombudsman presentation

Jo spoke about The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman and the focus was on Who they are, what they do. Jo spoke about how the Ombudsman works and makes it’s decisions. Basically the PHSO was set up by Parliament to provide an independent and free complaint handling service. It is the final stage for complaints about the NHS in England.

The PHSO staff considers on the following.
– can they investigate?
– should they investigate?
Other factors include
Suitable complainant
Time limit
Legal remedy
Another organisation that could be involved.

Jo also spoke about how the PHSO gave’s evidence in the form of.
– Hearing from both sides
– opportunity to tell the PHSO what lay behind clinical decision making
– clinical records
– CCTV, phone records
– witness statements/visits/interviews

There was also an explanation about how the PHSO investigate complaints. As they look to see if what happened was in keeping with relevant regulations, standards, policies and guidance or established good practice. If it wasn’t, the PHSO look to see how significant the shortfall is and the impact that it has had and, if it has caused hardship or injustice, if that has that already been remedied by the organisation.

The PHSO also work with the following organisations.

Stats and figures were given for the carers group to digest from 2018/19

112,262 enquiries received
82,998 enquiries resolved through advice or re-direction

28,841 complaints handled by casework teams
24,183 complaints were not ready for us
5,658 decisions were made including:
746 investigations upheld
871 investigations not upheld
3,597 assessment decisions
444 resolutions

The PHSO also updated us on what they have been doing recently. As from last year they ran a public consultation to get people’s views on the draft NHS Complaint Standards. The consultation generated a lot of interest and feedback. On 24 March 2021 they published a report that set out the responses they received and explained what they did and the changes they made in response to the feedback.

There was a long Q&A session regarding the PHSO’s work and how the focus can be influenced by unpaid carers. This was the short update for my Lewisham’s mental health carers forum for June.

Lewisham BAME MH Carer Forum February 2021

Welcome to the February update of my Lewisham BAME carers forum. Out of all the carer forums and peer support groups I run, this one focuses on BAME carer experiences and challenges. The forum although focuses on Lewisham, BAME carers from outside the borough are welcome since there is a lack of BAME carer networking groups, especially BAME carer-led forums. I might even consider changing the name to Bromley, Lewisham and Greenwich BAME carer forum since I am very active in Greenwich and the actually BAME carer forum is fairly linked to Bromley, Lewisham & Greenwich Mind via the Community Wellbeing Hub.

For February our speakers were.

Dr Shubulade Smith CBE Psychiatrist from South London & Maudsley.

Dr Shubulade Smith CBE is a British academic and consultant psychiatrist at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. She is a senior lecturer at King’s College, London and Clinical Director at the NCCMH and forensic services at SLaM. Dr Shubulade is a heavy supporter of BAME causes especially due to her field and experiences, so it was an honour to have her engaged with BAME carers.

Danielle Perlman is a senior Project Manager at SLaM NHS trust and is passionate about engaging with the community with the South London listens project. More on that later.

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Sharing your experience of Lewisham health and social care services

When I was caring I felt that the services my mother used impacted on my caring experience. I feel its vital carers do the same and feedback about health and social care services.

Are you a Lewisham resident? Have you been using health and social care services during the pandemic, whether it’s digitally or face to face? Are you passionate about improving health and social care services for the community?  

I encourage you to leave any feedback, positive or negative, about your experiences (it is ANONYMOUS). This can be about your local pharmacy, GP, hospital, optician, dentist or community health, mental health, and social care services. 

Share your feedback here: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/8B8Z3MZ 

You might also consider sharing it with one or two of your friends and family members?

More information:

At Healthwatch Lewisham they are continually wanting to hear and learn from patients, carers and relatives about their experiences with health and social care services in Lewisham. This has changed slightly during COVID-19, however, to ensure patients have a mechanism for leaving feedback and helping to improve services for the community, we have created a Patient Experience Survey. 

Your feedback allows Healthwatch Lewisham to see what is going well for Lewisham residents and what can be improved. 

To learn more about Healthwatch Lewisham’s current work or to leave feedback via their Digital Feedback Centre on their website, please visit www.healthwatchlewisham.co.uk

Lewisham BAME MH Carer Forum September 2020

Welcome to the brief update of my Lewisham BAME Mental Health carer forum which is aimed at minorities caring for someone with a mental illness in the borough of Lewisham. The September forum looked at engagement from South London & Maudsley’s IAPT service (Ellen Heralall) and also engagement from the SLaM QI Peer Project Worker (Richard Mortan).

We were joined by the regular carer members and also newer members including some from my other carer group in Greenwich. There were also some members from community groups including African Advocacy Foundation, Bromley, Greenwich & Lewisham Mind’s community wellbeing group and others.

We were also joined by the comms rep from Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust who was interested on BAME developments in the area. We were also joined by Leonie Down from SLaM who is developing partnerships across Lewisham as part of the transformation of mental health services. Part of her role is to bring together a community strategy for service users, staff and carers within slam.

Ellen explained more about the IAPTs service which means Increasing Access to Psychological Therapy. The IAPTs service has just been running over a decade. They are based in primary care. So they operate very closely with the GPs and operations within GP surgeries. The IAPTs is also now part of the national framework, which is provided by NICE (National Institute of Care and Excellence) which recommend treatments. The aim is to provide easy access for the community to receive psychological therapies for depression and anxiety primarily, but not complex mental health conditions.

The referrals would come up from the GP and people can refer online to go through the triage process. Then they’re offered either step two treatment, which is a Guided Self Help well-being option via online CBT and psycho-education.

Ellen explained that the therapy will usually last generally from six to eight weeks. She mentioned that as with a lot of NHS services, they are fully aware of the discrepancy in the quality of services for the BAME community, accessing IAPT services. Plus when they do access our services, we are also aware of the inequality of their experience and their outcome in poor experiences.

So SLaM have been working on their objectives, but they are resourcing and working hard to look at improving the access of IAPTs to the BAME community,

SLaM are working with our community partners. Which is the big drive for SLaM at the moment to work with community groups, especially with ones attending such forums e.g. community groups, wellbeing groups and fitness garden projects that already exist in the borough. SLaM are partnering up with such groups and seeing how they can work together to bring psychological therapy and mental health awareness treatment to the community in a way that is relevant for them.

Ellen reported that SLaM are also reaching out to step outside of the box and make themselves more accessible to provide such psychological treatments, but also to build more relevant services where to a greater racial understanding of how racism, and discrimination and inequality affects mental health. This helps in raising the awareness of triggers in such experiences. Racism is a trigger and discrimination can also be a trigger to mental health. It is important such forums like the BAME carer forum exist so these things can be talked about in safe spaces.

Ellen mentioned that it’s good to be at the carers forum to talk and network about how how we can continue to become a more accessible and more relevant service.

IAPTs will work with those from culturally sensitive support groups. So there’s lots of different projects IAPTs is involved in. They have become a sort of a broader service that is probably in excess of 100 staff on IAPTs alone.

Ellen felt it was time to open up to questions from the members and attendees from the Lewisham BAME carers forum.

Question and answer session at the forum

The first question was on working with grassroots practictioners on issues with racism, discrimination and some data triggers that effect on mental health.

They wondered how IAPTs is mainly dealing with practitioners and the community within that kind of setting and how does it actually work? Especially with the aim to raise awareness and to deal with the issues of the experience of racism in the community.

Ellen mentioned that there was someone who had been running these groups already. She runs the groups in culturally sensitive emotional support groups aimed at the black and African African Caribbean community, which were 12 weeks. Ellen quoted that the groups were safe spaces to talk about mental health and a convient way to develop emotional wellbeing.

Other questions were on staff and how many were from the BAME community. Ellen did not have the figures to hand, but is bound to bring them at a later date, although she did mentioned about 50% to be vague. Ellen actually leads on the counseling team and because they come through a different sort of training and different routes they tend to get a very diverse range of counselors.

The psychological well being of practitioner to practitioners are now become more increasingly diversity, Ellen might have to get back to exactly the figures, but SLaM are certainly visibly increasing numbers of young BAME psychologists coming into that work stream, where the mental health service have the biggest problem is in in high intensity CBT.

Although BAME therapists certainly are increasing, Ellen felt we’re not there yet. The service is still actively recruiting BAME therapists.

The impact of COVID and technology

Another question arised regarding COVID-19. The carer member queried about lockdowns going on for another six months, he felt carers will come to the organization in six months time, with the community suffering with depression, anxiety and stress. The carer was wondering how they’re going to cope with the extra load BAME carers who have suffered.

Ellen responded on why she is glad to be at the forum. She would like to speak with the group to be able to plan resources. She admitted it would be a difficult task. Within the Lewisham IAPTs she mentioned they have got two priority streams. One of the streams they call priority pathways where One of them is NHS and social care and the priority stream can be tailored to support BAME carers who have been hit hard by the COVID-19 impact.

The carer member responded back stating supporting BAME carers through the crisis is only part of the problem. He felt how can black people know what IAPTs is doing? Especially for COVID-19. So they feel they can come to you when they have a mental health issue and not waiting till they’re in a crisis.

Even the internet can be a problem in itself. If you haven’t got the internet, how do you get on onto a website? So I’m just looking about what IAPTs is doing?

Ellen did completely agree that they are also concerned about people who don’t have access to the Internet and digital services. The services are hoping to open up one of our sites, so that they can do face to face work for people who can’t access digital treatment. They even do telephone treatment which works quite. There is still a lot of work to do.

Other carer members were interest in the size of the Lewisham IAPTs team and how the core element works in diversity. The carer member was interested in how IAPTs is reaching the community. Other members gave some ideas regarding churches, supermarkets and leaflets. Some members mentioned there is a problem with GP referrals and there was criticism on social perscribing in where people just get endlessly referred and not supported.

One other question I felt was interesting was from another carer interested in if there is a body? Which has overarching responsibility for your services in terms of any mental health? This then led to another question from another carer regarding when IAPTs signposts people to the other services, social services and so on. Is there an effort made to check with how that signposting is working? How did they actually make a good connection? How long? How long does it take for that person to get an appointment.

Presentation from SLaM QI Peer Project Worker

Next up to speak to the BAME carer forum was Richard Merton whose role at South London & Maudsly NHS Foundation trust is to try and improve service user and carer voices into MH services. Richard started about how they had an event in July, where the aim was to talk about people’s experiences of meaningful contact during COVID and the sort of things that might help going forward.

From that event they took that away some themes and feedbacks. One of the themes or discussions that was touched upon in that event was of how the trust can support BAME carers. So Richard reminder us that there is another event on the 8th of October and it would be great if anybody wanted to come along to that. A lot of the things that was also discussed at the last event in July was around technology and access to technology, plus some of the things that the forum had been talking about.

Question and answer session regarding Quality Improvement

One carer member was interested in the speed of action from meetings as in how long when they have decided what the outcomes are of these meetings? The carer member continued stating how will Richard or the NHS Trust be able to really take to put decisions into practice? Because he does not want us to say, yeah, we’re going to do this and We’re going to do that. And then this time next year, we’re still working for the outcomes of these, because of the situation we are were under a moment.

The response from Richard was on how things are going to take some more of a structural change. However the event is kind of a listening event based on what communities asked initially. Richard suggested that he thinks it’s always important to come back to someone and annouce what could or could not be done based on what was requested.

Another carer member issued a request stating that if Richard be sure to send information about the October event through the involvement register. Plus to make sure to use ways and other means of sending the information out and spread it as widely as possible to the community.

Another member of the forum mentioned the situation with local government and the impact on BAME carers. She felt that people are not looking at financial aspect of that being at home and having to be connected digitally. Its like having to use the internet and there is no compensation because BAME carers are having to make sure they have to stay online, to be able to be in contact with all the things that are going on in the community, but the bills are going up.

The community support member continued to mention that she has lots of clients who are actually in financial problems. As in losing money in which they can’t have the internet, they can’t be able to be involved. So what aspects are they going to help people like that, she thinks this needs to be looked at the long term due to the high risk of people losing their jobs.

Richard mentioned that NHS England, have got a branch called NHS-X, which looks at technology. And so that’s slightly will take a bit longer, but they’re looking at questions like the community support member raised. Richard also raised the point that at the trust they had a response to COVID. They have a few what they call workstreams going on and one of them is remote consultations and how we can do that across the trust.

Another carer repeated the question saying this problem with technology and paying for broadband and so on, has been going on even before COVID-19. She had to support someone and still supporting that person after she had spiralled down into severe depression. It seems that one of the causes was the person she is supporting was in serious debt, partly because of phone bill.

One of the newer carer members pointed out that the financial issues have always been an issue. And it’s a mental issue. And it’s just the way it is, and it’s never gonna change any time soon. But the question really is how you change that. And when you use the word inclusion, or what we use when we talk about community, there was a way of taking that deficit and turning it into a positive. This is what is needed to be involved in a community. So if there’s a way of paying it back then it is a sort of benefit. Because then you’re giving help to that person who then learns as if it’s an education. I have no idea why this is not happening, but all businesses should have a social responsibility

Richard mentioned how there was support from Charity especially regarding the purchase of mobile phones to help mental health staff connect more with their patients. Richard admitted charity cannot be the complete answer. Richard also wanted to say that a few of people at the forum came to an event in June, which was a big broadcast, where SLaM plan on developing work streams linking the leaders of the council’s together, and and looking at some of these social issues.

Some of the members of the forum are also members of the Lewisham BME Network, one member of the group mentioned an initative from Microsoft that is currently investing in BAME communities. She felt that it is really significant if Microsoft is connecting with some of the groups, and maybe other providers are doing the same like Virgin, or one of those. She felt that perhaps we could ask them on what they do for charities. So there’s probably things we could do in the community that would impact the way we take on the digital platform.

Other carer member raised an important point on that there are many strands to what needs to be done within the community. But if we’re talking about the individuals, within the community, black and white who are experiencing poverty and no access to the internet and phones. He thinks there’s more of a structural in political resolution to this and not just community based solutions. So maybe talking to MPs and putting pressure on them in that sphere, to look at the whole wide community as a whole, not just particularized issues that we’re raising today.

This concludes the brief update of the September Lewisham BAME carer forum.

Lewisham Mental Health Carers forum August 2020

133Welcome to the August update of the Lewisham Mental Health carer forum. This forum usually runs from the Carers Lewisham centre, but is now run online in order to avoid carers risking COVID-19 and taking it home to those they are caring for.

As a reminder the forum is an engagement, educational and empowerment group for those caring for someone with a mental illness. The mental health, health and local authority services are complex, ever changing and sometimes risks non-involvement or coproduction of carers and patients. The forum is a chance for carers to know what is happening in services and who is responsible for them.

South London & maudsley have been very supportive of the carer forums for over 5 years and counting. Still not only our local mental health trust engages with the forums. It now seems the Care Quality Commission is interested in grassroots forums.

The forum runs every last Tuesday of the month from 1 pm. For August we were joined by carers from other trusts including those in Greenwich and others from Southwest London. The carers were interested in how this forum runs and what they could take away from what was explained there.

Guest speakers were the CQC and also Lewisham’s Clinical Team Leader for mental health community services.

We started off by hearing from Susan George who is an inspector for the Care Quality Commission. Her main work is in inspecting GP practices. The CQC look at how they are complying with the regulations of the health and social care act, but also to look at the quality of care.

The inspectors from CQC recently visited my Lewisham BAME Mental Health carer forum and although they wanted more information on inspecting mental health services, it would be strange to say that GP practices were not involved. There is an extra twist, because the forums are carer forums the CQC are interested in how GPs are recording and identifying carers.

Quality-Care-Commission

So for August forum, the CQC were back to observe and engage with the forums closer than before. They are interested in becoming members.

Susan has been active for about two years and the look of the portfolio of GP practice in southeast London in Lewisham. Members are interested in the organisational structure of the CQC and what departments report to who and so on.

Susan continued by mentioning they want to improve their reporting on the quality of care provided by GPs for carers in the community. She feels there is definitely some work we can do together to try to improve the narrative in terms of how we report our findings in the area. She gave thanks to Natalie Parsons, who is a manager in the hospital’s Directorate at CQC.

The Lewisham Carers forum was also joined by SLaM’s involvement lead for Lewisham and Croydon. She also run’s the Lewisham advisory group that has raised several points for discussion with Lewisham health commissioners.

Susan mentioned that as an inspector she is particularly interested in the support that GP practices give their carers. It is vital for doctors and GP practices to identify patients who are carers, and that might include young carers as well.

She thinks it’s true to say that carers have certainly been affected by the change In the way that GPs are providing consultations, such as online consultations, and that, as an inspector, she is sort of looking closely at how access to these services change for people who may be vulnerable people with illness. This goes double for carers as well. It is a real challenge, because not everybody set up with online, facilities, internet and so on. Susan is also particularly interested as well around the space of health inequalities that have started to be talked about since COVID took hold, and particularly around the health inequalities in the BAME community. So it’s good for her to get to join your discussions in the forum.

GP Lewisham

Susan mentioned that one of the things we are trying to do is work across directorates. She feels forums like this one can help the CQC to share ideas about how they can improve and reporting on the quality of care for carers, especially when they go into GP practices, the CQC will expect to see their carer’s register. Plus the CQC will also want to see if the GPs are improving the number of carers that they’ve identified.

She thinks we do need to have more conversations within CQC. Natalie may have touched on this, and they are looking at how they can improve their our approach and methodology. So, at the moment, it’s still in the early stages. Still one of the areas has been identified on how the CQC can engage with providers to help to drive that improvement.

Questions from carer forum members

One carer was interested that the Care Act 2014 was released close to 6 years ago and feels change is not coming far enough. The carer feels that things have been going backwards due to cuts in services and local services. The carer asked Susan why are things taking so long?

Susan agreed in stating that it shouldnt have taken as long as it should. She does feel that there is real focus on it now. Its about the relationships the CQC can now build and listening to people like us and having frank conversations.

I did mention that to be fair, I do not think it’s completely the CQC’s fault, because there’s many other organizations including the local authorities. I mentioned that this forum struggles in getting a local voice because we can never find who or what is responsible for certain things.

Another carer was interested in how do the CQC capture carers feedback about the service they receive?

Susan responded that we do try to speak to people when we go on inspection and they pick up on information about how to feedback. There is also a chance to feedback on their website.

Susan mentioned that they also want GPs to publicize how carers can give feedback or leave feedback. So that we can also look at that on inspection. So the CQC will look to see whether GPs have got a system where they invite and asked feedback. If they have got posters in the waiting room, inviting carers to give feedback about the care and service they receive. The CQC can even also monitor phone calls and emails that we receive. So we’ll be looking at those quite closely.

gp-surgery

One carer member fedback on her experiences with her GP and how she experienced qualify of care for her and who she was looking after. The carer acknowledged that we all know the mental health is the Cinderella of the NHS. So you can see how many in all these directions that things are falling on the the unpaid carer. Susan agreed that the carer made a really good point about that sort of twofold awareness of the GP needs to have. The GP practice needs to have about not only identify with carers, but how is the carer is getting on with the person they care for

Another carer agreed that the online consultation for obvious reasons, was not going to be sufficient and a lot of people don’t know how to go online. Even if their GP sent them some information, it might not be always easy to access or to understand what the GP or drugstore have liaised with.

Susan agreed with the carers comment about how the lack of mental health focus on carers literature and leaflets. One of the things the CQC like to check when we go into the practice to inspect is that there’s lots of information for carers and that’s visible and perhaps using different languages. Susan from the CQC is also going to find out if they have an analytical team at CQC that helps to provide Some data for the next forum.

I mentioned that the way I see this forum is that carers can come together as almost as an empowerment. Besides since GPs are businesses anyway. So i would be interested to have like a list of GPs to have some rating in regards to how they are responding to carers. Plus how they engaged with them and what sort of initiatives are set aside for carers.

One more carer spoke about the difficultly she had when the surgery stated that she needed to bring her ‘cared for’ into surgery. Even though she escalated it and got through the practice manager, the surgery still insisted they couldn’t do anything due to confidentiality and this led to prescription issues.

Susan stated that they’re not allowed to ignore complaints and that they need to acknowledge your complaint within probably a couple of days, and they need to investigate it. Because when a patient complains, or when somebody complains to practice, it may well be that there are elements of how they provide a service that are actually falling short, and they’re not going to improve unless they investigate.

Susan raised an example of that learning can be shared with members of staff involved, and she felt you should definitely continue to raise that complaint to the GP practice and they should acknowledge your complaint and also give you a sort of timescale about how they’re going to investigate. The CQC always encourage people to complain directly.

General Manager for mental health in communities discussion

Stephenie Edwards introduced herself to the forum as the General Manager for communities. They are in the midst of and have been for some time of actually starting to transform some of their community services. Over the years Stephenie has been attending some of the carer forums, but she is retiring now. So it will be the last time that we actually see her at the forum.

Stephenie continued that they were starting on creating pilots last year and they have been going out to service users and carers just to actually gain some views and thoughts. One of the things that was brought up was around waiting times, for both clients and carers. What they have done is that they were changing around their front end about services, particularly in that where they were splitting their services into neighborhoods. They piloted the split initially from last March 2019 for neighborhood 1, and what used to be their assessment and liaison service where people can be referred by GPS, is actually now based within the Waldren GP centre in Depford, and so their nurses are Mental Health advisors, application specialist OT, social workers based on site.

stringio

Patients also go to other GP practices and they have what’s called a very quick triage. So GPs can request a service as soon as service users couldn’t be contacted if things were urgent within 24 to 48 hours.

Stephenie stated that they started in March two weeks into their pilot, but unfortunately they were hit with what the what the whole nation is dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. This disrupted their systems and all of their plans. Still to some extent we were adaptive because they created groups to run from different sites and services, but at the moment, you can’t work face to face with people in group settings over time. To in some cases, online and the OTs are trying to work out other ways of working with service users that are face to face.

It was suggested by SLaM that the team launch another pilot for neighborhood three in Lewisham. Stephenie mentioned she was excited to say that she is going to meeting after this where they will be saying whether it’s safe or not to launch, neighborhood three. She anticipats it will be safe and start launching the day after the carers forum. The team have a new staff interface, that is a challenge to the launch. So what they have found Is that Deptford which is north of the borough is very different to South of the borough of Lewisham. One of the reasons is there are different communities there that they had to get to know in terms of meeting patients, but they are going around GP surgeries and asking if they can have some space to see people on GP sites.

Stephenie made a point that lots of people in the past, potentially felt stigmatized, by coming into community mental Health teams, we would have as much as possible we can see people just coming in for services within GP practices where you know, where where we can get, I think, any available space in GP surgery premium, but that’s what we’re hoping. And, and we have expanded or we’re in the process of psychological interventions for service users.

She feels this is a big thing because service users have told them for a long time that there needs to be more psychological intervention. And she thinks as it stands at the moment, we’ve increased our psychological retention by 15 new posts, however not all the people are in those posts at the moment, but they are recruiting to run the adverts are out. So there’ll be a lot more psychological intervention available.

That might be quite short term intervention or some longer term intervention, but it will be a standard model of care. So people will be assessed when they come in. And then from that assessment, it will be decided and agreed to what care plan and what an intervention would be best at that time for that person.

Traditionally, Stephenie’s team worked primarily with care coordinators who are managed care of a number of people, maybe 25 to 30 people. What she is having trouble with is actually recruiting nurses. And that’s been ongoing for the past four or five years. The thing is they have a number of vacant posts that they haven’t been able to recruit to repay agency costs equal to a higher premium. So when they have started to look nationwide, about how they can do things differently.

Questions from the carer members

One carer member was interested on who Stephenie’s successor would be. The CQC were also interested. Stephenie stated it was someone called Wendy Dewhirst she currently works in Southwark at their acute referral center. Wendy has worked for SLaM for a long time.

Another carer gave a suggestion that because one of the major things as people with mental health is, if they know this, their benefits is going to be stopped. It doesn’t take a genius to work out and it would send them spiraling. Some of them could end up being sectioned. That’s how bad things have got. Could you please have a specialist for PiP forms within the mental health team.

Stephenie explained that Bromley, Lewisham & Greenwich MIND are employed to help on this and they work with them. She mentioned they do a lot of work around benefits and are very skilled in it. They have also got vocational support staff and a lot of service users that they work with. Vocation workers themselves are absolutely experts in benefits, but the demand is so high that they can’t do that all themselves.

The carer replied that in the past a service couldn’t get help on benefit forms and that person just gave up. She knows it’s impacting mental health survivors and she knows this is going to have a knock on effect on service users which cause their mental health to deteriorate as well. Stephenie did admit that it’s going to get bigger with service users being furloughed maybe in October not having a job to go about, but she feels that’s where their vocation specialists will do all they can to help people retain their job.

Other carers are continuing the raise the matter of carer support workers, especially some years ago 2 SLaM carer support workers were lost and now no one has any understanding of carer support numbers. Stepehenie mentioned that a new carer support worker role will be introduced and mentioned this was a drive by Lisa Brian who heads adult social care in the borough. Denise O’brien is at the point of recruiting the carer support worker and they will be working with on strategy for carers in Lewisham. These adverts are going out either imminently or going out over the next four weeks. So it’ll probably take at least two to three months before carer support worker is actually in post. I requested that the advert also be sent to the group so carers can see what role the carer support worker will be employed for.

Another carer was interested in how community mental health services in the Borough of Lewisham were taking into account diversity issues of carers. Stephenie agreed that this should be a remit for all services across the country. She continued by stating Donna Heywood Sussex who is Lewisham’s Service Director has taken BAME issues very seriously and they are in the process of producing a BAME strategy. Plus they also have Leonie Down who is Lewisham Head of Occupational Therapy and Safeguarding Adults Lead working to engage the community and also get staff involved in the BAME strategy as well. She did state its worth asking Denise O’Brien to attend the forum to speak to carers about any carers strategy, but over the 5 years it has been difficult to get any insight into carer initatives in Lewisham and carers are wondering if there is co-production at a local authority level.

It was good news that the involvement lead will try again to get Denise to attend the forum and speak to carers about any initatives and we are really hoping things will be different this time. Lastly there was an update from Jane Lyons who is the involvement lead on getting patient systems to talk to each other. These being of patient records by with SLaM EPJs and GP patient systems.

This concludes the August update of the Lewisham MH carers forum. Next month 2 mental health trusts are to send their carer support leads to educate carers about the importance of carer peer support their carer peer support strategies.

Lewisham MH Carers forum June 2020

133Welcome to the June update of the Lewisham mental health carers forum. A forum aimed at unpaid carers supporting someone close who has a mental illness. This is one of the 4 carer groups that I run per month. In attendance were our usual carer members along with representatives from Lewisham Healthwatch. The speakers from South London & Maudsley NHS trust being psychiatric Liaison staff and the lead from SLaM Patient Advice Liaison service. We were also joined by SLaMs involvement lead for Lewisham and Croydon, plus we were also joined by the Mental Health Lead of Lewisham and Greenwich Hospital trust.

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Lewisham MH Carers forum May 2020

Welcome to the month of May’s update of the Lewisham Mental Health Carer forum. This is one of the 5 carer groups I run once a month to give carers a chance to find out what is happening to health, mental health and local authority services aimed at carers.

For this month we were joined by South London and Maudsley’s Associate Medical Director Dr Zain Sadiq who is also a psychiatrist. We were also joined by Lewisam’s Wellbeing Map coordinator Tim Bradley. At the forum we had a number of carers as well as carer champions, the modern matron from SLaM’s Ladywell inpatient wards. We also had in attendance the SLaM involvement lead for Lewisham and Croydon as well as Carers Lewisham staff and a representative from POhWER mental health advocacy.

I explained the reasons for the forum being the following.

1. It can be difficult for Carers in Lewisham have an idea on MH services and influencing them.
2. MH carers need some empowerment in their role.
3. Services have suffered from cuts, carers need to act in order to support everyone.
4. There needs to be an engagement platform for carers to discuss issues.

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