Category Archives: Aimed at Carers

Blog posts aimed at non paid carers caring for someone unwell.

New book – A Caring Mind by Matthew Mckenzie

This is my first blog post of many about my new book “A caring mind”. If you have visited this site in the past, then you are probably fully aware that I promote the experience of caring for someone with a mental illness. This book of course is no different and promotes my cause even further.

There are several differences between this site and my book and that is I cover my carers journey when caring for my mother and supporting my brothers. I also cover more in depth the importance of carers getting involved and also networking with each other.

Some information has been taken from my website and added to the book, but I have also included new topics that can only be read from my new book “A caring Mind”.

For anyone caring for someone with mental illness this book can give many things including identifying with other carers, giving hope for the future, examining current carer themes, empowerment for mental health carers and plenty more

Here are the chapters of the book, but if you wish you can buy my book from Amazon

  1. Telling your carer story
  2. My story
  3. Caring through Coronavirus
  4. The tragedy of Young carers
  5. Carer traits and characteristics
  6. What I found vital for carer support
  7. Networking with Fellow Carers
  8. Including unpaid carers in NHS Co-Production
  9. The stigma of an unpaid Mental Health Carer
  10. What I learned as a carer

Top 10 reasons for carers to give views on healthcare

me_edited-1Welcome to another blog post by Matthew Mckenzie, a former carer and carer activist from South London. I usually focus on carers who care for someone with a mental illness, but at times I delve into health and mental health.

Never before has the healthcare system in the UK been under a spotlight due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

There are many organisations that request unpaid carers to share their opinions on healthcare. One of them being healthwatch.

download

You as a carer can experience what healthcare is like, when the person you care for receives that care from health or mental health services. If the patient’s care is poor from those services, then unpaid carers are forced to step in. If health services do well, then the burden on carers is lifted.

To watch a video blog of this post, click the video below.

It is so important carers of those using the health care system come together and submit their views on healthcare.

Top 10 reasons to put your views on healthcare as a carer

1. To provide feedback to improve health services.

– At Healthwatch engagement meetings, Healthwatch usually ask questions to participants on how do they think health services are doing? It is the best time for carers to report or feedback how services are affecting the person they care for. These views can go back to improving health and social carer services.

2. A fulfillment of changing something

– Although carers can get fed up of stating the obvious when health services continue to struggle. It can be a fulfilling experience to use the power of your voice to institute change.

Not many people have time for unpaid carers along with the ‘cared for’ to try and change things for the better. As a carer its a chance to change things, which is better than no chance at all.

3. A great way to network with like minded people

– At times, there might be other carers attending Healthwatch events or groups interested in how health and social care is affecting carers and their ‘loved ones’. The more you attend health engagement events, the more you can network with like minded people. It is in carer’s interests to network and understand the pressures on health systems.

4. Getting information on health services

– It is not always feeding back your opinion on health and social care. At Healthwatch events, there are often reports and updates to the community. As a carer you can get the chance to find out how services are doing.

You can even ask questions requesting reports and updates for particular services, it is your right to know and you should exercise that right.

5. Being part of the ‘health’ community

Without good health or good healthcare services then the community suffers. There are local and national drives to improve health for everyone and get people to understand the importance of health services. A community that is interested on how health services is performing is able to inspire others. It takes time, but it is worth it.

images

6. Making a change for the better

People can either wait around for health services to change or continue to complain. Carer’s can try to see the overall picture of what things could be like if they feedback on healthcare experiences.

Carers cannot always expect the person they are caring for to do this all the time, so carers must want to change things for the better. A better healthcare system supports everyone, health professional, patients and their carers.

7. The reward is greater than the risk

The risk of healthcare failing or not getting responses can be catastrophic for everyone. The more feedback a healthcare system gets, the more information that can be tailored to improve health services. If people do nothing then their is always that risk. The risk can cause health systems to not perform, causing more patients to be unwell and not get a good experience of care.

8. Know who is responsible for what

When attending Healthwatch meetings and engagement events, notice who also turns up. There might be health commissioners who are responsible for purchasing health services. There also might be those who run those health services. Just knowing who those people are can be a way of holding them to account on services. It is possible at these events to even ask them questions or queries.

Healthwatch

9. Meeting the challenges

The health and social care system is under increasing pressure. If it was not for increasing budget problems to services, then the COVID-19 crisis has increased the strain on services. All these are challenges for the 21st century and carers should try and rise to meet those challenges.

10. Helping other carers in your field

Information, reports and surveys from Healthwatch should not just stop at the carer attending such events. Carers can take the lead and spread information to other carers, especially at carer support groups or carer forums. Not every carer can be everywhere at once, so veteran unpaid carer can help others become more aware on how services are doing.

Telling your Carer’s story

Fotolia_73087289_XSHello, everyone, welcome back to another carer blog from former mental health care Matthew Mckenzie.

This time I am writing my book about my caring experiences. The book is soon due for release. I say probably about two weeks time or perhaps the end of next month. I certainly will release it really soon. I have titled my book “A caring mind” but I don’t want to talk too much about the book. The book involves a lot of things and I’ll be doing In more blogs about the book, due to my experiences of being a carer over the years.

This particular blog is about telling your story as a carer.

To watch the video about telling your story as a carer, see below.

One of the chapters in my book is about “my story”, which is chapter two. I also explain the reasons why I took on the caring role for my mother, plus also helping my brothers. I also explain what the things I experienced and I explain a bit about my carer story journey and how it changed over time.

A few things I want to point out is that when you tell your story it shines a spotlight or at least highlights specific issues. If you tell your story as a carer, it’s a way of forming connections to those who are listening to your story, this being other carers.

I find it’s a way of release, when you’re telling your story, especially if your carer’s journey was very difficult. When you just want to tell others “This is what I’ve experienced” or “This is what I’ve gone through” then you’re sharing it with other people.  It might not even be a difficult journey, but it is a way of releasing that out there.

Giving help

There are other main reasons and why it’s important to tell your story as a carer. I think probably the most biggest reason would be that you’re actually educating others. Now, I’ve mentioned before that you would be more likely be telling your story to other carers. In the past when I’ve told my story, and it could be at events or conferences, I found it was a way to educate not only the audience, but within the audience, you could have other carers and pacifically health professionals, those who provided health and support for your loved one or the person you’re caring for. So you’re educating the professionals via health or social care.

Now I’ve looked around as to why it is really important to tell your story as a carer and I’ve come across a report or document released in 2015. It’s came from NHS England website.

And basically the title of this document is “Using stories to improve patient carer, and staff experiences and outcomes” It mentions stories of staff, patient and caring experiences, and journeys through their health system enables NHS to redesign and improve care, according to the patient’s needs are the carer’s needs, where every step of the patient journey is examined and improved.

Reasons to tell your carer’s story

The whole aim of telling your story in some sense would be to improve how the health system works how local authorities provide carer’s support to carers.

When health and social care organisations do events, they want to look into what happened due to a serious incident or a death. They want to improve the approaches or systems regarding complaints or what worked well and what didn’t. They would look at perhaps this is a very good example would be a promotion of service perhaps in a ward or in a GP practice or surgery.

They will display information leaflets on what is happening in a particular service and a good way to promote the service is to have a carer or patient tell their story at that event. But there are many other reasons in using a story to improve the outcomes and redesign or improving health care, health and social care systems.

How you can form your own carer story?

You have to start somewhere. And the aim is to get that story out. Now, what I was told in the past when I was caring for my mom is to perhaps do a journal perhaps everyday if you can, or maybe once a week and how things have been developing because you can look back and look into that journal say, Okay, I tried this, it didn’t work out. It was kind of trying my out caring role and checking what is working.

Embed from Getty Images

When you do a journal, it wasn’t really about to form a story. It was about to keep an eye on if anything goes wrong and you can provide evidence and it can help in writing a doctor’s letter, if there’s a particular issue or symptom that the person you were caring for is suffering, but it can also be used to form your own carers story.

Where can you tell your carer’s story

I want to talk about really where you would want to tell your care story. Now I found the easiest way that I, in the past have told Mark hear his story was probably at NHS carer support groups, because what would happen to your support group is that they would speak to each carer at that group and say you say to them, how things going along for yourself. So I think that’d be an easy way of building up the confidence to tell your story. Another way if you have a fair bit technical knowledge, is there’s no reason why you can’t develop an online video on YouTube.

A good way to tell your story is at events. As in conferences, promotions, especially at mental health trust events. When I was caring for someone using mental health services. My local mental health trust put on carer conferences or carer events, or even mental health events, and they would invite a carer, to tell their story, or even at board meetings, or NHS training courses.

They would invite carers to tell their story and as a way of co-production and getting involved. Another way would be to blog, your story. If you have a website or blog site, there’s no reason why you can’t blog about your carer story. Lastly you could immortalize your story in a book, but be aware that it’s important to have some aspect into confidentiality when you tell your story if the person is still alive or if there’s others involved in that story. Please try and think about confidentiality unless you agree with them that you have to mention them in your book or in your story.

Conclusion

In conclusion, you know, I’ve noticed Carer’s Trust and other major carer’s charity in the UK encourage carers to tell their story. I don’t think even matters even if you’re a carer or former carer, it’s always good to try and tell your story. never tire of telling your story again because it does educate others, and it’s a way of telling others about your identity, your carers identity, and has been a main part of your life.

Caring through stigma

 

¿Îÿè!üTñùoõ‘}Æ¦`1® äVòoµwümkY×p

Hello fellow carers. Every so often during writing blogs off my carer forums, I tend to write about the carer experience. In this particular blog I want to write about stigma and make unpaid carers aware of what stigma is and the damage it can do.

Just to make things clear that when I talk about carers, I am not talking about NHS workers or nurses. I am talking about people who care for someone severely unwell in the family, or perhaps caring for a close friend. I am not saying that some in the NHS are not caring for someone in the family, but I want to cast the net out and bring in those whose identity is blurred away.

This blog site focuses a lot on mental health carers, so I do not want to stray too far from them. As a reminder a mental health carer is someone looking after a person with mental health needs. This could be a form of psychosis, bipolar, depression, Post-traumatic stress, OCD and so on.

Depressed woman sitting on stairs

Unfortunately with mental illness, stigma does strike at the heart of those affected. The stigma can affect both carer and ‘cared for’. Many may ask what is stigma?

The Shame

It does not take long to google the word ‘stigma’ and see it linked to mental illness. Stigma can involve many things, but often stigma is linked to mental illness.

Basically stigma is Fear and anxiety about a disease that can lead to negative attitudes and beliefs toward a person and their characteristics. This can be down to others not understanding mental illness be it a lack of education, awareness, fear or worst of all ridicule. With MH stigma, suffers of mental illness begin to lose friends, family support and can be ostracized from the community.

Embed from Getty Images

The stigma often can hit the sufferers family and close relationships. Some in the family may stay clear from the situation leaving the most concerned to take on the carer role. Some in that family might even actively practice stigma and even then the sufferer of the illness might be stigmatised through their own illness as they will not engage with health and social care services.

Unfortunately it can be that the mental illness itself can blur how the sufferer understands what is effecting them. It is as if the mental illness makes it harder for the person to come to terms with what they are going through.

When I was caring for my mother, I noticed over the years how many friends withered away, even some neighbours kept their distance. I myself experienced a lot of stigma as some laughed at me when they realised I was caring for someone with mental illness. During the early years my mother became sectioned often as she struggled to cope with medication and support. Many would see her taking to the hospital by the police or ambulance and would gossip.

The continued experiences of watching my mother go through the rotating door of the mental health inpatient ward took its toll and I got tired of trying to educate and explain to others on reducing negative views. At one point, even I kept away from my mother as she took out her frustrations on me.

With no where to turn, I withdrew into myself and battled stress, depression and anxiety and mental illness can be catching. With a strong carer focus, I managed to look after myself and spare enough energy to continue to look after my mother.

Would not have it any other way

Looking back at it, I can be proud as I would often hear many let that stigma drive away those close to them. I stood by my mother until the very end as a son should do, although I am aware that not all carers can do this and there is no shame in walking away, because sometimes health and social care cannot provide that support.

There was always a risk that the stigma and lack of support would push me to becoming the next mental health patient, but I had to be strong. I had to keep working to help in bills, providing care and support, holding the family together and setting an example to fellow MH carers.

Embed from Getty Images

I will not lie, the experience of care has worn me down and I do not get too close to others. There are some things I cannot explain as yet because it will bring painful memories to the surface. I can say this though that time and patience does help.

If I had to go through it all again, I probably would and I most likely would have done quite a few things differently.

There is no shame

As an educational part of this blog post, I would like to mention there is no shame in caring for someone with mental illness. It does of course depend how unwell they are and you as a carer will need support. It is advisable get as much support from health services, friends and family.

Embed from Getty Images

You of course will have to be strong when stigma comes your way, many just do not understand. Many do not realize that mental illness is very common as we all suffer from anxiety, stress, anger and depression. It does not take long to notice that a tip over the edge can lead the sufferer to severe mental illness.

I certainly have more patience with those who have mental illness and refuse to laugh and joke when I see someone in the street battling the illness. It can happen to any of us or those we are close to. There is no shame in mental illness and with the corona virus epidemic, society will have to get used to mental health because there will be a lot more to deal with.

Making that difference

Silhouette of man showing his hand on sunset sky background, Successful business concept.Welcome to a blog site of former carer Matthew McKenzie from South London. I used to care for my mother who passed away this year. For close to 18 years I have been supporting her and my brothers who both have autism, but for my mother she had a difficult time with mental health. There was only so much I could do and a lot of support depended on health and social care services that were already struggling.

Continue reading

Latest edition of my MH Newspaper

Fotolia_73087289_XS

Hello all,

There are no Carer forums for December, but in the meantime I am working on the posters for my new carer peer support groups and also working on my Carer audio series.

 

For more information on my Therapeutic Carer Audio series, please check the link below.

Carer audio series

Please also check out the lastest edition of my Mental Health Newspaper.

 

Carer traits and characteristics

Finger art of a Happy couple. The concept of couple laughing.Welcome back, Its not long until “Carers Rights day”, which takes place on the 21st of November. I am sure to do a blog and maybe a video about it, but still it is a couple of weeks away, but keep a look out for local carer events in the meantime. This particular blog is on carer character traits.

Basically when people think about unpaid carers, they often think that the person is just caring for someone. In a way there are correct, but delve a little deeper and they could be off target. There is a whole lot more to a carers world than what people might think.

So I have decided to list and briefly explain some unpaid character traits, this blog is aimed not only at health professionals, but carers themselves who might wish to understand what they might find helpful on their carers journey.

Please take take note, not all unpaid carers are the same and due to trying to keep the blog post short, I have missed out a lot of carer character traits and skills.

Providing a simple hug.

Not all carers do this, it really depends on the relationship with the ‘cared for’. Some unpaid carers are very close to the person suffering either mental or physical ill health, but giving a simple hug to that person can help more than any words can say.

Authenticity

Just caring for someone shows that you are wearing the badge, you are wearing the carer’s badge and no one can say you have not been there. If asked to speak about your carers journey, then you will understand. An unpaid carers journey can be difficult, full of tension and a roller coaster ride. As a carer you can expect to take some massive blows, but at the same time you are growing stronger in your cause.

real

Being a shoulder to cry on (very difficult)

Not always easy especially if the ‘cared for’ is distant from you, but as a carer you can always be there as a shoulder to cry on. There will be times that the ‘cared for’ will be let down by everyone, be it friends, health systems and so on. If you are close to the ‘cared for’, just being a carer will give them the opportunity to be the last person they can cry to.

shoulder to cy

Being Present (most important!!)

The most important trait of an unpaid carer. There are only a few other ways to care, but being there is the ultimate role of a carer. Some people have big families, but not everyone in that family is going to equally care for the ‘cared for’. Sometimes the carer is the one who will sacrifice or put on hold their life to provide that much needed support. A carer will be there at hospital appointments, doctors appointments, care plan assessments, benefit assessments, they will provide medication or chase things up and more. Being there for the ‘cared for’ is what it takes to be a carer.

Being there when times are tough (difficult)

Being there is NOT enough, its when the chips are down that the true worth of being a carer is on the line. Its no good providing support when the crisis is over, but I am aware that carers cannot be around the person all the time. I am also aware that it is not a criticism of carers who tried so hard, but were pushed away, especially mental health carers. Still, there will be times when the impossible may be asked of you, as a carer you will need to be there especially when there is a crisis.

being there

Believing

There are not many rule books on being a carer, there has been times when I am thinking to myself am I doing the right thing, because no one can really tell you that you are living your life the best way. There were times my ‘cared for’ hit crisis after crisis and I was banging my head against a brick way with all the bureaucracy, confidentiality and red tape. I was even dealing with bullying from NHS staff siding with the ‘cared for’s’ criticism of me and to be frank, I was on my own. The keyword is ‘Belief’, you as a carer might have to dig down and start believing in yourself. What are you caring for? What are you fighting for? What are the costs? The sacrifices? Is it all your fault? Sometimes only you can answer those questions.

Compassion

Very close to being there as a carer, you will need to show compassion, patience and to be kind. It is not easy to do if you are under stress or constant pressure, being compassionate can even extend to others if you practice being compassionate to the person you care for. If you lack compassion, then you could do damage to the relationship.

compassion-clipart-1

Confidentiality (Can be very difficult)

Sometimes carers have to be confidential about who they care for, but most times a carer will have to deal with confidentiality. It is frustrating because in the end it will be you that providing the carer and support, but how can you do your role if no one is saying what to expect for the ‘cared for’. Its like they are saying ‘Just get on with it’, when the patient is discharged into your care. I have noticed a culture where health professionals state the ‘cared for’ is discharged to the social worker’s care or the care coordinator’s care, but what happens they move on from their jobs or leave? The carer is the constant person in that role and should never be pushed aside or forgotten. Learn how confidentiality works, especially when Carer’s Rights Day takes place on the 21st of November.

confidentiality-clipart-confidentiality

Connection

Being a connection to someone is not easy at all. It depends how close you are to the ‘cared for’. Sometimes a carer is just a person in name and role, but being a connection to someone is highly psychology. There are whole books on the subject on connecting to others and the subject is also one of the ‘5 ways of wellbeing’.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/improve-mental-wellbeing/

It is not always easy connecting to someone who is unwell, but it can benefit yourself as well as the ‘cared for’.

Empathy

Similar to compassion, Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what the ‘cared for’ is experiencing. This is why many carers try hard to work out what the situation is, so that they can provide adequate support and care. Without empathy then you are making guess work, but sometimes it is not always the carers fault. If unpaid carers are pushed out due to confidentiality or not involved, it is difficult to understand what the person is going through, especially if its mental health. Remember, if the health professional is not always present and the ‘cared for’ is very unwell, then it is usually up to the unpaid carer be it friend, neighbour or relation.

Helping (knowing when to help and how)

Sometimes caring is a grey area, there is more to caring than just helping with physical or mental health support. It is also being around to help, this might be arranging meetings, advocating, helping the health professional, helping with money situations and so on.

Super Dad Juggling

Hope (Very common among carers)

Without this trait, you might even want to give up on caring for someone, there should be some form of hope that the ‘cared for’ will recover or at least live with the illness. Sometimes unfortunately there is no recovery, so all you can hope for is to be a witness to the person’s suffering, but deep down inside all unpaid carers hope for some change.

Love (most common thing among carers)

Another common trait with all unpaid carers. You care because you love the person or are emotionally tied to them. Love is a vague word, but without some form of love, it is difficult to care for someone let alone care for anything. Sometimes people overlook the love between carer and ‘cared for’, but it is there. Even if the carer had to walk away from their role, this still could be done out of love and when things really go wrong, then love hurts.

love_is_on_the_air_311635

Loyalty

Very difficult for carers to do, but being loyal to the ‘cared for’ can be an important trait, but what happens when the ‘cared for’ refuses help? When does the question of being loyal become a risk? This is when carers need to break confidentiality and raise the issue if the ‘cared for’ is at severe risk. E.g. reporting to the doctor, social worker or another professional.

Open and loving friends

Not really a carer trait, but something a carer would find helpful. Unfortunately, friends tend to go off packing when having to deal with a carer fighting something depressing. It does not help that carers due to their role will lack a social life, so it is harder to make new friends, but if you are lucky to have friends around who are open and understanding, it can help you in your carer journey.

download

Openness.

A risky trait, but expect to use it sometimes. As a carer you will have to be honest about a situation, you might expect to be put between a wall and a hard place. Basically when the ‘cared for’ is refusing help, you will have to raise the call for help, even against the ‘cared for’ wishes. A carer will have to be truthful and open about what is going wrong and expect your relationship with the ‘cared for’ to decline, but think to yourself, what is the risk? You might be thankful one day that you were open and honest about something. Expect the relationship to be slow to build back up again, if ever.

Phone call to check on how someone is

As a carer, it helps to use many tools in your carer’s journey, this is often used if your a distant carer (someone caring from a distance). Even if the ‘cared for’ is not in crisis, a carer might call to see how things are, you might never know what the ‘cared for’ might say. Take note, that with the advent of smart phones, it might help to add the person on Whatsapp, Skype, Facebook or other applications.

girl-talking-clipart-28

Quality time

Sometimes it is not always about care, care and caring. Spending quality time with the person can help make a difference. Think of it this way, what was the person like before they became unwell? Your relationship might have changed somewhat, but deep down they are still that same person. Sometimes spending quality time is what is needed and expect to do this as a carer to help connect with them.

Safety (common among carers)

Did I say common among carers? It probably is the number one rule book for unpaid carers. You might think providing a safe space for the ‘cared for’ is all that it is, but that is not the full story. Ever heard of the consequences when things go wrong in the health system? Carers will sometimes protect the ‘cared for’ especially when serious incidents will occur, think of wrong medications provided, or wrong decisions putting the ‘cared for’ at risk. Then it can be a tug of war when the carer has to push for the ‘cared for’ to get that support from the health and social care system. Overall the carer will have to be a shield for many things and expect to take some blows.

bear and bunny

Show up physically and mentally

Not the same as being there, expect to take on health and social care settings. Sometimes you as a carer might think some things are being done as a tick box, well you could be right. As a carer you will have to deal with the following professionals.

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Nurses (different Bands)
  • Mental Health Counselor (families)
  • Social Worker
  • Care Coordinator
  • Ward Pharmacist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Ward Manager
  • Admin for services
  • GP
  • Peer Specialists
  • Advocates
  • PALs Team
  • Home Treatment team staff

Yep! and this is only the HALF of it. So as a carer how would you prepare in an important meeting, if you are not sure what that person does or if the professional is being difficult? Well, I am sure at some point I will blog about engaging with professionals, but as a carer, do not expect the ‘cared for’ will do the legwork.

Smiling or trying to

As a carer you don’t have to do this, in fact it is better to seek support if you are feeling down rather than pretend and put on a false smile. It does obviously help to keep one’s spirits up, but be honest with your wellbeing and reach out for support for yourself as well.

face

Someone to really listen (listening skills)

This is very important for unpaid carers. If the ‘cared for’ has no one to talk to then expect to listen and avoid saying much or criticism. This is not something easy to do, because it depends on your relationship to the ‘cared for’. There has been times I have had to listen because the person I care for ended up ranting due to being unhappy with how she was treated. It was just because there was no one she would trust to rant to instead, not even the Samaritans. In the end, I just kept quiet and listened, then walked away hoping that her complaining helped in some way. As a carer, expect to listen, but also expect to learn some listening skills.

Time alone (Important!!)

It is so important that you as a carer get time alone for yourself, it might be for recharging your energies, thinking things through or just relaxing. This is probably because a carer has to go through a lot, especially all the things that can play on the carer’s mind. If a carer cannot get time alone, then they could themselves become the next patient.

me times

Trust (Very common)

In health professional we trust! As carers you will need to put your trust in professionals because you cannot do everything yourself. You will have to hope and trust that your doctor will involve you in the ‘cared for’ situation. If that does not work, then pray the doctor is skilled in being diplomatic enough to remind the patient why they need support from those close to them. Sometimes doctors tend to take the easy way out and let the patient’s word be law, but life is not always as simple as that, why? Think about the serious incidents when the carers or public were right about someone being at risk and the health professionals were wrong. It does happen and unfortunately it won’t be the last, but until then the carer will have to trust in others and trust the ‘cared for’ will seek support.

Words of encouragement (what words to use)

Expect as a carer to encourage the ‘cared for’ to not give up hope. The carer will need to be skilled in being supportive with words and not only just in listening skills. In fact a carer may end up becoming some form of counselling for the ‘cared for’, but only if support structures are lacking.

images

The conclusion.

Unfortunately these are just some of the carer’s traits in the carers journey. The carers world can be a difficult long struggle, but it can also be rewarding as you share the ‘cared for’ life successes, hopes, dreams and struggles. It need not be unbearable tough if you learn as much as you can on what it means to be a carer.

Good luck in your caring journey.

Fotolia_73087289_XS

Being part of something

106542Hey there! Welcome to another new blog from unpaid carer Matthew Mckenzie. I have just come back from the Carers UK Conference 2019. As a carer I was inspired on how the event went and felt part of something. I felt part something very big and felt I should write up a couple of my thoughts on this post.

I had shared a panel session at the Carers UK conference and due to limited time, I could not manage to say all what I would have liked, however I felt I got the main messages out there to the audience. I wish this particular blog post carries on my message to other unpaid carers who stumble across this blog post.

This message is to you…fellow carer.

Continue reading

Carers and GP Surgeries

me_edited-1Welcome back to another blog post by unpaid Mental Health carer Matthew Mckenzie. I often write blog posts that try to focus on carer issues, but sometimes I stray into areas of mental health, events and the field of psychology, sociology and maybe psychiatry. Of course I don’t stop there. I run carer engagement/strategy forums in south London and every so often I tend to update how they went on this site. Feel free to check out my Youtube channel or twitter channels where one channel focuses on the carer experience and the other channel on mental health developments.

Enough with the shameless advertising, this particular post is on a much needed subject and it is aimed at unpaid carers, however I hope GP surgeries get the time to read considering at the last Lambeth forum there was major discussion on the Lambeth Patient Participation group network. I have also arranged for the Lewisham PPG chair of South Lewisham Practice to present and update the members of Lewisham BAME Carers forum.

Continue reading

Sometimes us unpaid carers need to step up

smallerHello again, I have not blogged in a while, because being so active in my area due to attending events, running carer strategy forums and networking like hell. I know the title might seem a little off putting, but in my long experience of being involved in health and mental health services as an unpaid carer, there are a few things I have noticed.

Just to note, I am writing as an unpaid mental health carer, basically a carer supporting someone close who has mental health needs. Unpaid carers struggle quite a bit to get noticed, their culture is to put the ‘cared for first’ and themselves last. Perhaps it is a respected human trait, carers come with a big heart, but it does come with some risks. This is what I will be blogging about today.

Continue reading